Iron in the Human Body: Why Is It Important and How Can You Regulate Normal Levels?

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The body has a lot of minerals that aid with essential human functions. Iron is part of a cluster of minerals that the body requires for everyday health and athletic performance. An iron deficiency in the body can have many detrimental effects when left untreated. Therefore, understanding the function of iron in a human’s body and how to regulate its level is vital for healthy living. Here is a detailed guide about this mineral and how to prevent its deficiency.

The importance of iron in the human body

Iron is essential in the human body because it helps produce hemoglobin and myoglobin. These compounds deliver oxygen to red blood cells and muscle tissue to ensure your body can function normally.

A healthy level of iron is critical for optimum health, athletic performance, energy levels, focus, and more. Conversely, iron deficiency causes extreme fatigue and other detrimental symptoms. Therefore, regulating this mineral is vital.

Using supplements to get more iron

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Supplements are a good source of iron, depending on the types you are using. Hundreds of orally ingested supplements can help improve iron levels and might be efficient to a certain extent. However, they can cause gastrointestinal symptoms. They may also be difficult for some people to absorb. 

Fortunately, there is an alternative delivery method: using an injection or IV to infuse iron-rich supplements directly into your bloodstream. Drip Hydration, Injectafer and Vitality Medical provide concierge Las Vegas iron infusion services in the comfort of your home. There is no need to wait in line for hours to get an iron IV because the mobile services are provided in your living room. You can easily set an appointment for whenever it suits your schedule.

Incorporating foods that are rich in iron into your diet

Diet changes are an effective way of regulating iron levels. Making those necessary changes could help prevent further health complications that require specialists’ attention. So what are the best foods to eat for higher iron levels? 

At times, your body might not absorb the iron from your food. In that case, you have to focus primarily on improving iron absorption. Some of the best foods for this purpose include citrus fruits, tomatoes, and greens. These healthy fruits and vegetables improve iron absorption from foods that primarily have iron.

Seafood, red meat, and beans are very rich in this mineral. Therefore, pairing off your diet with these foods could significantly improve the regulation of iron.

Symptoms of low iron levels

Since iron plays a pivotal role in blood circulation, it can affect many parts of the body. Patients with iron deficiency could suffer from brittle nails or pale skin. Other physiological symptoms include shortness of breath, heart palpitations, and extreme fatigue. These symptoms are triggered by the lack of healthy red blood cells, which could lead to anemia. 

If you are experiencing these symptoms during pregnancy, getting medical assistance is very important. The baby could suffer from developmental delays if your iron deficiency does not get addressed accordingly. Medical professionals may prescribe iron supplements or take other measures to treat any underlying causes of iron deficiency anemia.

Are athletes at risk for iron deficiency?

A seemingly unlikely demographic for iron deficiency is athletes. One would assume that since they live an active lifestyle, they’re not predisposed to such conditions. But the truth is that athletes need more iron than the average person because of the demands they put on their bodies. Unfortunately, low iron levels in athletes can cause the typical symptoms listed above. 

Athletes could start feeling fatigued, and this can hinder their performance. A boost of iron in the body could improve the function of hemoglobin and the circulation of healthy blood to muscle tissues. With iron supplements and a healthy diet, athletes can perform better in on-track activities and other exercises.

Top Photo by Andrea Piacquadio