Moby-Dick by Herman Melville

In a sense, then, Melville’s most famous work (published in 1851) is made up of two different books: the one is the novel proper, which is a great and unique work of American literature; the other is a long-winded and pedantic study of whaling and whales generally.

“Wise Blood” by Flannery O’Connor

The sheer originality of “Wise Blood” is, for me, one of its strongest attractions. It is an amazing grace tale that is simply inimitable—and amazing.

Hombre by Elmore Leonard

The plot concerns a man named John Russell. He is a non-Native American who was raised as an Apache; and if you want an example of stoicism or “grace under pressure”, here it is.

Exorcism Literature

Stories about the supernatural fascinate and attract, I suppose, because they deal with those realms of human experience that are mysterious.

“Koba the Dread” by Martin Amis

But horror more than anything else permeates Amis’s history of the Soviet Union. He gives readers a nightmarish overview of a little-known and enforced famine that ended the lives of some five million people.

“Dead Souls” by Nikolai Gogol

Nikolai Gogol published his great novel, “Dead Souls”, in 1842. The plot concerns a man named Pavel Ivanovich Chichikov, who buys dead serfs from various landowners; not the cadavers of these serfs, rest assured; only their names.

Kristin Lavransdatter by Sigrid Undset

Sigrid Undset’s masterpiece is actually a trilogy.

Light in August by William Faulkner

“Light in August” (1932) is set in the American South during the era of racial segregation and is focused chiefly on a protagonist named Joe Christmas.

Deliverance by James Dickey

Anyone who has spent a night or two in the wilderness knows that there is always a potential for danger.

Aristotle for Everybody by Mortimer J. Adler

I have a certain rule of thumb with respect to the great philosophers of the past...

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Havana 1920 in Downtown San Diego

Havana 1920, a fantastic and intimate Cuban restaurant located at 548 Fifth Ave., in the Gaslamp Quarter, just south of Market Street was my breakfast stop on Monday.